Module also offered within study programmes:
General information:
Code:
UBPJO-191
Name:
The Emergence of World Society
Profile of education:
Academic (A)
Lecture language:
English
Semester:
Spring
Responsible teacher:
dr Małecka Anna (amm@agh.edu.pl)
Academic teachers:
prof. Sackmann Reinhold (reinhold.sackmann@soziologie.uni-halle.de)
Module summary

Description of learning outcomes for module
MLO code Student after module completion has the knowledge/ knows how to/is able to Connections with FLO Method of learning outcomes verification (form of completion)
Skills
M_U001 Student is able to analyse the emerging structures of the world society. - Presentation,
Examination,
Activity during classes
M_U002 Student is capable of deep reflection upon the contemporary world. - Presentation,
Examination,
Activity during classes
Knowledge
M_W001 Student acquires knowledge of the processes of globalization. - Presentation,
Examination,
Activity during classes
M_W002 Student has knowledge of national identity in the context of globalization processes. - Presentation,
Examination,
Activity during classes
FLO matrix in relation to forms of classes
MLO code Student after module completion has the knowledge/ knows how to/is able to Form of classes
Lecture
Audit. classes
Lab. classes
Project classes
Conv. seminar
Seminar classes
Pract. classes
Zaj. terenowe
Zaj. warsztatowe
Others
E-learning
Skills
M_U001 Student is able to analyse the emerging structures of the world society. - - - - - + - - - - -
M_U002 Student is capable of deep reflection upon the contemporary world. - - - - - + - - - - -
Knowledge
M_W001 Student acquires knowledge of the processes of globalization. - - - - - + - - - - -
M_W002 Student has knowledge of national identity in the context of globalization processes. - - - - - + - - - - -
Module content
Seminar classes:
The Emergence of World Society

Questions of globalization touch upon crucial questions about the sustainability of our society, in a broad sense of the word, which is also documented in the frequent public discourse on this topic. From an academic point of view globalization processes show the emergence of a society. The emergence of a society is especially interesting from the point of view of social structure analysis since it is usually assumed that social structures evolved over periods of several centuries and meanwhile have become part of the traditional self-conception of nations. Analysing processes of the emergence of a world society in contrast shows that these processes of structural evolution are conflictual and frail and do not lead necessarily to a predefined end. The leading question of this seminar is: What are the emerging structures of world society and are they stable in the long run? In the first part of the seminar we will look at differences between societies and how they are reproduced. In the second part of the seminar we will analyse mechanisms of convergence between societies and ask how unstable these processes are. In the third part the seminar concentrates on the emergence of distinct structures of world society in several empirical fields.

Course Objectives:

To analyze the development of a new society.

To understand how nation states produce and conserve difference.

To compare processes of internationalization.

To develop critical thinking skills in discussion.

To take different actors’ perspective on processes of globalization.

To present and write about complex social processes.

To take what you have learned in this seminar and see the continuing implications and relevance.

Schedule:

Please note that this schedule is tentative and schedule to change at the instructor’s discretion

March 15: Introduction, background. Entering the field. Reproduction of difference by state and culture.
Text: Therborn, Gøran (1995): European modernity and beyond. The trajectory of European societies, 1945 – 2000. London: Sage, pp. 207-227.

March 20: Reproduction of difference by economy.
Text: Soskice, David (1999): Divergent production regimes: Coordinated and uncoordinated market economies in the 1980s and 1990s. In: Kitschelt, Herbert/ Lange, Peter/ Marks, Gary/ Stephens, John D. (eds.): Continuity and change in contemporary capitalism. Cambridge. pp. 101-134.

March 21: Production of convergence.
Text: DiMaggio, Paul J.; Powell, Walter W. (1983): The Iron Cage Revisited: Institutional Isomorphism and Collective Rationality in Organizational Fields. In: American Sociological Review 48: 147–160.

March 22: Convergence in economy and crisis.
Text: Jung, Jiwook; Dobbin, Frank (2014): Finance and Institutional Investors. In: Karin Knorr Cetina und Alex Preda (eds.): The Oxford handbook of the sociology of finance. Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, pp. 52–74.

March 27: Emergence of world culture
Text: Giulianotti, Richard/Robertson, Roland (2012): Mapping the global football field: a sociological model of transnational forces within the world game. In: British Journal of Sociology 63: 216-240.

March 28: Hegemony and crises
Text: Arrighi, Giovanni (2013): The long twentieth century. Money, power and the origins of our times. In: Darel E. Paul and Abla Amawi (eds.): The theoretical evolution of the international political economy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 230–239.

March 29: World structures and competition
Text: Werron, Tobias (2015): What do nation states compete for? In: Boris Holzer, Fatima Kastner and Tobias Werron (eds.): From globalization to world society. Neo-institutional and systems-theoretical perspectives. New York, NY : Routledge, pp. 85–106.

Topics for presentation/essay:

1) Borders
Massey, Douglas S./ Durand, Jorge/ Pren, Karen A. (2016): Why Border Enforcement Backfired. In: American Journal of Sociology 121: 1557-1598.
Elden, Stuart (2010): Land, terrain, territory. In: Progress in human geography 34: 799–817. DOI: 10.1177/0309132510362603.
Mau, Steffen; Laube, Lena; Roos, Christof; Wrobel, Sonja (2008): Borders in a globalized world. Selectivity, internationalitzation, exterritorialization. In: Leviathan 36: 123–148.

2) Nation state and nationalism
Bonikowski, Bart (2016): Nationalism in Settled Times. In: Annual Review of Sociology 42: 427-449.
Hobsbawm, Eric J. (1992): Nations and Nationalism since 1780. 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press pp. 163-192.
Janmaat, Jan Germen (2007): Civic Culture in Western and Eastern Europe. In: Archives Européennes de Sociologie 47: 363-393.

3) Production regimes
Deeg, R. (2001): Institutional Change and the Uses and Limits of Path Dependency: The Case of German Finance. MPIfG Discussion Paper 01/6.
Boyer, Robert (1997): French Statism at the crossroads. In: Crouch, Colin/ Streeck, Wolfgang (1997)(eds.): Political economy of mo¬dern capitalism. London: Sage. pp. 71-101.
Crouch, Colin (2003). Institutions within which real actors innovate. In: Mayntz, Renate/Streeck, Wolfgang (eds.): Die Reformierbarkeit der Demokratie. Frankfurt/M. pp. 71-100.
Hall, P.A./Soskice, D. (eds.)(2001):Varieties of capitalism. Oxford.
Strange, Susan (1997): The future of global capitalism; or, will divergence persist forever? In: Crouch, Colin/ Streeck, Wolfgang (1997)(eds.): Political economy of modern capitalism. London: Sage. pp. 182-191.
Streeck, Wolfgang (2010): E Pluribus Unum? Varieties and Commonalities of Capitalism. MPIfG Discussion Paper 10/12.
Streeck, Wolfgang (2012): How to Study Contemporary Capitalism? In: Archives européennes de sociologie 53: 1-28.

4) Path dependency
Acemoglu, Daron/ Robinson, James A. (2013): Why nations fail. London: Profile Books. Chapter 3, 4 and 15.
Crouch, C. (1993): Co-operation and Competition in an Institutionalized Economy: the Case of Germany. In: Crouch/Marquand, D. (eds.): Ethics and Markets. Oxford. S. 80-98.
Pierson, P. (2000): Increasing returns, path dependence, and the study of politics. In: American political science review 94: 251-267.

5) Financialization
Davis, Gerald F./ Kim, Suntae (2015): Financialization of the Economy. In: Annual Review of Sociology 41: 203-221.
Korzeniewicz, Miguel (2012): Commodity chains and marketing strategies: Nike and the global athletic footwear industry. In: Lechner, Frank/Boli, John (eds.): The Globalization Reader. Fourth Edition. Malden: Wiley. pp. 160-169.

6) Global inequality
Milanovic, Branko (2016): Global Inequality. Cambridge: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. Pp. 118-212.
Hung, Ho-fung/Kucinskas, Jaime (2011): Globalization and Global Inequality: Assessing the Impact of the Rise of China and India, 1980-2005. In: American Journal of Sociology 116: 1478-1513.
Lin, Ken-Hou/Tomaskovic-Devey, Donald (2013): Financialization and U.S. Income Inequality, 1970-2008. In: American Journal of Sociology 118: 1284-1329

7) Financial market crisis
MacKenzie, David (2011): The Credit Crisis as a Problem in the Sociology of Knowledge. In: American Journal of Sociology 116: 1778-1841.
Dodd, Nigel (2011): ‚Strange money’: risk, finance and socialized debt. In: British Journal of Sociology 62: 175-194.

8) Financial repression
Reinhart, Carmen M. (2012): The return of financial repression. In: Financial Stability Review 16: 37-48.
Tabb, William K. (2007): The Centrality of Finance. In: Journal of World-Systems Research 13: 1-11.
Bordo, Michael, D.; Landon-Lane, John (2013): Does expansionary monetary policy cause asset price booms? Some historical and empirical evidence. National Bureau of Economic Research. Cambridge, MA (NBER working paper, 19585). Online verfügbar unter http://www.nber.org/papers/w19585.pdf.

9) The constitution of world culture
Kollman, Kelly (2007): Same-Sex Unions: The Globalization of an Idea. In: International Studies Quarterly 51: 329-358.
Meyer, John W. (2010): World Society, Institutional Theories, and the Actor. In: Annual Review of Sociology 36: 1-20.
Boli, John/ Elliott, Michael A. (2008): Facade Diversity. In: International Sociology 23: 540-560.
Luhmann, Niklas (1997): Globalization or World society. How to conceive of modern society? In: International Review of Sociology 7 (1): 67–79. DOI:10.1080/03906701.1997.9971223.

10) World languages
De Swan, Abram (2003): A Political Sociology of the World Language System. In: Robertson, Roland/White, Kathleen (eds.): Globalization. Vol. VI. pp. 3-28.
Nederveen Pieterse, Jan (2003): Globalization as Hybridization. In: Robertson, Roland/White, Kathleen T. (Hg.): Globalization. Bd. I. S. 265-290.

11) China, the new hegemon?
Beckley, Michael (2012): China’s Century? In: International Security 36: 41-78.
Dahles, Heidi (2010): The multiple layers of a transnational „imagined community“: the notion and reality of the ethnic Chinese business community. In: Djelic, Marie-Laure/Quack, Sigrid (eds.): Transnational Communities. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 57-81.
Gulick, John (2011): The Long Twentieth Century and Barriers to China’s Hegemonic Accession. In: Journal of World-Systems Research 17: 4-38.

12) Euro crisis
Chick, Victoria/Dow, Sheila C. (2012): On Causes and Outcomes of the European Crisis: Ideas, Institutions, and Realities. In: Contribution to Political Economy 31: 51-66.

13) Why do nation states cooperate?
Haas, Ernst B. (1996): Why collaborate? In: Young, Oran R. (ed.): The international political economy and international institutions. Vol. I. Cheltenham: Elgar.
Levy, Marc/ Young, Oran B./ Zürn, Michael (1995): The study of international regimes. In: European Journal of international relations 1: 267-330.

14) Global law in the making
Halliday, Terence/Carruthers, Bruce G. (2007): The Recursivity of Law: Global Norm Making and National Lawmaking in the Globalization of Corporate Insolvency Regimes. In: American Journal of Sociology 112: 1135-1202.

Student workload (ECTS credits balance)
Student activity form Student workload
Summary student workload 100 h
Module ECTS credits 4 ECTS
Participation in seminar classes 30 h
Preparation for classes 35 h
Preparation of a report, presentation, written work, etc. 35 h
Additional information
Method of calculating the final grade:

Presentation: A presentation of max. 20 minutes on specific texts and topics. Reservation of topics will be possible after registration procedures. All presentations should be discussed with the instructor at least two days before presentation. The presentation is worth 20% of your grade.

Essay: An essay on the topic of your presentation is the second part of the grade. It is worth 70% of your grade. It should encompass between 8 and 15 pages. The essay should be completed by May 4 in 2017.

Attendance and Participation: This includes pop quizzes and participation in class discussions. There will be working groups in a number of seminar sessions. You will not be successful in this course without regular class attendance. This is worth 10% of your grade.

Reading and attendance: The format of the seminar expects every participant to have read all the basic texts that are listed in the following schedule. Furthermore, participants are expected to attend the seminar regularly and to actively contribute to the discussions in the seminar and in AGH’s Scholar’s Panel. The seminar is recommended for advanced students in the BA program.

Prerequisites and additional requirements:

Prerequisites and additional requirements not specified

Recommended literature and teaching resources:

All reading material for this seminar will be available on AGH’s Scholar’s Panel.
All presentation texts have to be collected by the presenters.

Recommended literature:

Wimmer, Andreas; Glick Schiller, Nina (2002): Methodological nationalism and beyond: nation–state building, migration and the social sciences. In: Global Networks 2:. 301–334.

Therborn, Göran (1995): European modernity and beyond. The trajectory of European societies, 1945 – 2000. London: Sage, pp. 207-227.

Soskice, David (1999): Divergent production regimes: Coordinated and uncoordinated market economies in the 1980s and 1990s. In: Kitschelt, Herbert/ Lange, Peter/ Marks, Gary/ Stephens, John D. (Eds.): Continuity and change in contemporary capitalism. Cambridge. pp. 101-134.

DiMaggio, Paul J.; Powell, Walter W. (1983): The Iron Cage Revisited: Institutional Isomorphism and Collective Rationality in Organizational Fields. In: American Sociological Review 48: 147–160.

Jung, Jiwook; Dobbin, Frank (2014): Finance and Institutional Investors. In: Karin Knorr Cetina und Alex Preda (Eds.): The Oxford handbook of the sociology of finance. Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, pp. 52–74.

Giulianotti, Richard/Robertson, Roland (2012): Mapping the global football field: a sociological model of transnational forces within the world game. In: British Journal of Sociology 63: 216-240.

Arrighi, Giovanni (2013): The long twentieth century. Money, power and the origins of our times. In: Darel E. Paul and Abla Amawi (Eds.): The theoretical evolution of the international political economy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 230–239.

Werron, Tobias (2015): What do nation states compete for? In: Boris Holzer, Fatima Kastner and Tobias Werron (Eds.): From globalization to world society. Neo-institutional and systems-theoretical perspectives. New York, NY : Routledge, pp. 85–106.

Scientific publications of module course instructors related to the topic of the module:

Additional scientific publications not specified

Additional information: